50s all out swing night!

•21 July, 2009 • 1 Comment

PICT3193The local swing dance place I go to in town had a gib shindig for the end of the semester, complete with live band and costume contest. Of course I couldn’t pass up a costume contest! I went all out 50s and won! Here are the pictures!

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A Night for the 20s

•21 July, 2009 • Leave a Comment

So I took a stage makeup class last winter and I loved it! This is my historical project 1920s. It happened to be that I did this on the day I normally go swing dancing, so I grabbed a fun 20s dress from the costume shop and went. Love it!PICT2742pik2

Bust out the Bustle!

•21 July, 2009 • Leave a Comment

By 1870 the cage crinoline had gone from round, to eliptical, to a bustle. Women’s dress was very full in the back with drapes, frills, pick ups, gathers and flounces of all kinds. Men had settled into the basic sack suit that is still around today. Basically this is one of my favorite styles just because it’s so interesting to look at. Enjoy! 

Woman in red dress with draped dress, green collar and trim, and small decorated hat. Man in basic sack suit with bowler hat and spats.

Woman in red dress with draped dress, green collar and trim, and small decorated hat. Man in basic sack suit with bowler hat and spats.

A springy dress of 1870 with swags on skirt, 3/4 sleeves and collar.

A springy dress of 1870 with swags on skirt, 3/4 sleeves and collar.

 

a fashionable woman of the 1880s wearing a green dress with pick-ups accented by rosettes. Lace up front bodice and small hat with ribbon.

a fashionable woman of the 1880s wearing a green dress with pick-ups accented by rosettes. Lace up front bodice and small hat with ribbon.

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How big is your hoop?

•21 July, 2009 • Leave a Comment

 

Welcome to the age of the crinoline! By 1860 the cage crinoline was in style and allowed women to have the full large skirts that they wanted without the weight and heat of multiple petticoats. For women the skirts multiplied till they were so huge it was difficult to fit through doors! The overly gathered sleeves of previous years have given way to palot sleeves that are flared, elbow or 3/4 length and worn over another tighter sleeve. The style still created a desending shoulder line that was fitted at the waist. Men still wore frock coats, and the general three piece suit was beginning to be worn. Men’s dress was also a lot more simple in this time period, mostly because of the Civil War and the need for servicable styles.

 

 

Woman in yellow evening gown with full balloon sleeves and embroidery detail. Man in double breasted frock coat.

Woman in yellow evening gown with full balloon sleeves and embroidery detail. Man in double breasted frock coat.

Women in black and gray mourning dress with palot sleeve. Union Soldier in full uniform.

Women in black and gray mourning dress with palot sleeve. Union Soldier in full uniform.

 

 

 

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Oh so romantic!

•21 July, 2009 • Leave a Comment

1830-1840 is what is reffered to as the romantic era in clothing. The women’s fashion had a very cinched waist with large sleeves and full gathered skirts. Sleeves were all the rage, big full and flounced was the style and the shoulder seam dropped onto the arm. For men frock coats were in, usually double breasted, vests were once again generally worn with everything, vest and neck cloth, pants were fitted and full length.

Man in brown frock coat with contrasting collar, red vest, cravat, top hat and stirrup pants. Everyday woman in violet dress with full sleeves and lace inset at bodice.

Man in brown frock coat with contrasting collar, red vest, cravat, top hat and stirrup pants. Everyday woman in violet dress with full sleeves and lace inset at bodice.

 

 
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1800-1810 What an Empire!

•8 July, 2009 • Leave a Comment

Say hello to the 19th century! Waistlines are stuck at an elavated empire during this period. Fashion is inspired by a classic Greek sillohette and girls throw out that overly corsetted waist! Actually it was a fad for the men of the time to wear corsets or girdles, stuff thier chests and pad thier calves. I’m sorry girls but it’s likely that Mr. Darcy wore a girdle, some dreams will just never really be perfect. You never know what people will do for fashion! On the bright side men actually wore full length pants during this time, and the stirrup pants becme popular into 1815. Basically life was simpler and America was getting into a settled pattern of independance with style reflecting that attitude.

 

Man with cut away coat and red vest, don't forget the boots! Women is in a green and yellow striped day dress with navy ribbons and sweep train, she is wearing a straw bonnet.

Man with cut away coat and red vest, don't forget the boots! Women is in a green and yellow striped day dress with navy ribbons and sweep train, she is wearing a straw bonnet.

Women is wearing a green spencer jacket over a pink dress with trim. The man is wearing a brown cut away coat with M cut lapels and a beaver top hat.

Women is wearing a green spencer jacket over a pink dress with trim. The man is wearing a brown cut away coat with M cut lapels and a beaver top hat.

1790 at a glance

•10 June, 2009 • Leave a Comment

Welcome the the year 1790!  The United States are free and independant with George Washington at the helm, and things are looking up for the States which is reflected in the clothing of the time. Now one thing to remeber with any period is that there is always overlap, just think of your great Aunt Nellie who still wears things she bought in the seventies. As is the case today the younger girls would often be wearing the most “fashion forward” item before it migrated to thier mothers and grandma would easily be wearing a style years behind her daughter. Basic dress was at the natural waistline for both men and women, differing from the styles of just a few years previous when the waist was lower for both men and women. As always the distinction of class comes into play in the way the clothing is made and what it is made of, not necessarily the basic style. I like to think of it as the generic and name brand difference of today. Regardless most people generally had thier everyday clothes and a nice outfit that would be worn to go to town or church.

Women’s dress was full at the waist and often emphasised by a padding to make it appear fuller. The neckline was very low and rounded during this period, always covered by a fiche or neck cloth for modesty. While today we may consider a petticoat an underclothing item, in 1790 they were more along the lines of a skirt and often an outer petticoat would be colorful and decorated with under petticoats to give the dress shape. A shortdress or caraco, a thigh length kimono style top with a back pleat, was the working women’s staple item and was worn over a skirt.

A town dress of the period with green petticoat, overskirt with pickups and a sheer fiche knotted at the back.

A town dress of the period with green petticoat, overskirt with pickups and a sheer fiche knotted at the back.

A house dress of the period with red petticoat, yellow short dress, neck scarf knotted in front, apron and mob cap.

A house dress of the period with red petticoat, yellow short dress, neck scarf knotted in front, apron and mob cap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A man always wore at least a waistcoat or vest at all times, what we would call a shirt was considered underclothing and therefore would be scandalous if worn alone. Some type of neck cloth was also considered to be necessary, whether a elaborately tied cravat or a simple checkered kerchief knotted at the neck. Breeches were tight around the knee and more fitted in front than in back, making for a “saggy bum” effect which was actually the style of the time. They had a front fall fly that would be buttoned at the waist. A waistcoat would most likely be the most elaborate piece of a man’s outfit and would often be made of fine fabrics with trim. The coat of the time was long, midthigh or longer and often the front was closed at the edge with a hook and eye type closure and buttons were merely for show. Hats were an in item, a bi-corne having becoming more in style than it’s triangular brother, and hair was worn long and generally tied back. 

Common man of the period, breeches with fall front fly, matching overcoat, waistcoat, and cravat.

Common man of the period, breeches with fall front fly, matching overcoat, waistcoat, and cravat.

All in all the 1790s were transitional in nature, waistlines were on the rise and a simpler styling was immerging that would dominate the world of fashion for the next twenty years.

 
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